Lake Havasu City is looking for educators!

Lake Havasu City is in need of one Administrator at District Office Level, 25 Certified, 21 Classified and 2 Substitutes.  Jobs are currently open for applying. Jobs begin on January 1, 2017.  Looking for a change?  Take a look! ~Sandy

Welcome to the Lake Havasu Unified School District Personnel Department home page. Lake Havasu City, home to the world famous London Bridge, is a growing desert community located in the foothills of the Mohave Mountains in western Arizona on the beautiful Colorado River. We are a community inspired by possibility and rich with promise. Our young city responds to a common purpose: To build a future dependent on our single most precious resource, our youth.

Our school district consists of 6 elementary schools (pre K-6), 1 middle school (7-8), and 1 high school (9-12). Total student enrollment is over 5500 students. We have about 650 staff members with 300 certified positions.

Our mission here in the personnel department is threefold.

  1. To offer an attractive, competitive wage and benefits package.
  2. To market Lake Havasu Unified as a great place to work, and Lake Havasu City as a great place to live.
  3. To help provide a strong support system for our employees.

We are currently accepting applications.

How Well Do You Know the American Constitution

I have kept a constitution test in my “Quizzes for my husband and son” File.

How well do you and your family know the Constitution?  ~Sandy

CONSTITUTION WORKSHEET
(PRETEST)
True or False
1. ______ Our first Constitution was called the Articles of Confederation.
2. ______ Under the Articles of Confederation, Congress had too much power.
3. ______ The first fifteen amendments are called the “Bill of Rights”.
4. ______ Our government is divided into three main branches.
5. ______ The number of articles in the Constitution is seven.
6. ______ There are 21 amendments to the Constitution.
7. ______ Laws for our country may be made only by Congress.
8. ______ United States Representatives have a four year term.
9. ______ Senators have six year terms.
10. ______ The number of representatives a state gets depends on the number of
people in the state.
11. ______ Representatives must be at least 30 years old.
12. ______ Senators must be at least 25 years old.
13. ______ The Vice President serves as Speaker of the House.
14. ______ The number of senators each state gets is three.
15. ______ All impeachments are tried by the Senate.
16. ______ A majority vote makes an impeached man guilty.
17. ______ Congress must meet at least once a year.
18. ______ Senators and Representatives are not paid for their work by the United
States Government.
19. ______ Senators and Representatives may hold no other government jobs while
they are in office.
20. ______ Only the Senate may write tax bills.
21. ______ A bill can never be passed without the Presidentʼs signature.
22. ______ Congress has no power to borrow money.
23. ______ Only the President can declare war.
24. ______ Congress may keep an army for two years at a time.
25. ______ Congress has no power over state militias.
26. ______ A writ of habeas corpus is the same as a bill of attainder.
27. ______ Ex post facto laws may be passed by Congress.
28. ______ Congress has no right to tax products sent from a state.
29. ______ Any state has the right to print its own money.
30. ______ The number of electoral votes a state gets is the same as its number in the
House of Representatives.
31. ______ The President must be at least 40 years old.
32. ______ The President must have lived in the United States for at least 14 years.
33. ______ The President is the Commander in Chief of the armed forces.
34. ______ The President has the power to pardon an impeached man.
35. ______ The President may make a treaty with a foreign country only if the Senate
approves it.
36. ______ The President chooses Supreme Court judges.
37. ______ The President may call Congress together whenever he thinks it is
necessary.
38. ______ Congress has the power to say what punishment is to be given for treason.
39. ______ United States judges are appointed for life.
40. ______ After amendments have been proposed, they must be ratified by a two
thirds vote in both houses of Congress to become part of the Constitution.
41. ______ An amendment may be made to change the number of senators the states
get.
42. ______ The Constitution is the highest law of our land.
43. ______ All Americans have the right to follow any legal religion they want.
44. ______ The United States Government may take any personʼs property if they can
show a necessity for it, but they must pay for it.
45. ______ In court trials, witnesses against a man must speak when he is there.
46. ______ A person may be tried any number of times for the same crime.
47. ______ A court may give any punishment the judge wishes to give.
48. ______ A state may make a law to keep a person from voting because of his
religion or race.
49. ______ Senators are elected by state legislators.
50. ______ A “writ of habeas corpus” may be suspended in times of war or in cases
where the public safety is involved.
MULTIPLE CHOICE
51. People are guaranteed freedom of speech, press, and religion according to the
a. second amendment c. fifth amendment
b. first amendment d. ninth amendment
52. The only amendment to be repealed is the
a. 15th b. 20th c. 18th d. 2nd
53. The number of main branches in our government is
a. 6 b. 21 c. 7 d. 3
54. Congress is divided into
a. 3 parts b. 2 parts c. 4 parts d. 12 parts
55. A Representative in the House is elected to a
a. 2 year term b. 4 year term c. 6 year term d. 8 year term
56. To be a Representative in the House you must have these qualifications
a. live in the state you represent
b. live in the state and have been a citizen for 7 years
c. be 25 years old, live in the state, and be a citizen
d. live in the state, have been a citizen for 7 years, be 25 years old
57. The number of Representatives a state gets depends on
a. the number of voters it has c. the number of Senators it has
b. the number of people it has d. how many they want
58. The Speaker of the House of Representatives is
a. the man they elect c. the Vice President
b. the Secretary of State d. the oldest Representative
59. The power to impeach an officer is given only to
a. the House of Representatives c. the Senate
b. the Supreme Court d. the President
60. Each state gets this number of Senators
a. 1 for every 30,000 c. 2 for each district
b. 3 d. 2
61. The length of a Senatorʼs term is
a. 2 years b. life c. 6 years d. 8 years
62. The Senators are now elected by
a. state legislators c. the state electors
b. the House of Representatives d. the people
63. To be a Senator in Congress you must have these qualifications
a. live in the state you represent
b. live in the state, be 25 years old, and have been a citizen for 7 years
c. live in the state, be 25 years old, and have been a citizen for 9 years
d. live in the state, be 30 years old, and have been a citizen for 9 years
64. All impeachments are tried by the
a. Supreme Court c. Cabinet
b. Senate d. House of Representatives
65. Bills to raise taxes may come only from the
a. Senate c. House of Representatives
b. President d. Cabinet
66. A bill becomes a law without the Presidentʼs signature if
a. two thirds of both houses pass it c. the Senate passes it
b. the House of Representatives passes it d. the Supreme Court passes it
67. A bill which has passed both houses can become a law without the Presidentʼs
signature if
a. the Supreme Court says so
b. the President does not return it to Congress in 10 days
c. the Chief Justice says so
d. the state legislators pass it
68. Taxes may be called for only by the
a. Congress b. President c. Supreme Court d. Cabinet
69. Rules for becoming a U.S. citizen may be made only by the
a. states b. Supreme Court c. Congress d. President
70. Money may be coined or printed only by the
a. Congress c. President
b. Secretary of Treasury d. Secretary of State
71. War may be declared only by the
a. Congress c. President
b. Secretary of Defense d. War Department
72. A writ of habeas corpus is used to
a. impeach the president c. get a man out of jail
b. tell a jury what to do d. ask for an amendment
73. The Constitution forbids the use of a
a. veto b. oath c. preamble d. bill of attainder
74. A law which punishes a man for something not wrong when he did it is called a
a. bill of attainder b. treason c. felony d. ex post facto
75. The Constitution forbids states to
a. make laws b. lay a sales tax c. coin money d. take a census
76. The Constitution forbids Congress to lay a tax on
a. goods sent from one state to another c. liquor
b. goods sent from other countries d. any good sent by ship
77. The number of presidential electors a state gets is
a. the same as the number of Representatives
b. the same as the number of Senators
c. the number of Representatives plus the number of Senators
d. the same as the number of state legislators
78. The qualifications for President are
a. be 35 years old, be a natural born citizen, have lived in the U.S. for 14 years
b. be a citizen, be 35 years old, have lived seven years in the U.S.
c. be a citizen, be 25 years old, have lived 14 years in the U.S.
d. be a natural born citizen, have lived in the U.S. 9 years, and be 30 years old
79. If neither the President nor the Vice President can serve as President, the next in
line is the
a. Chief Justice of the Supreme Court c. Speaker of the House
b. Secretary of State d. Attorney General
80. Treaties made by the President must get the approval of the
a. Supreme Court c. House of Representatives
b. Senate d. people
81. The length of a U.S. government judgeʼs term is
a. 2 years b. life c. 4 years d. 6 years
82. The number of people in the Supreme Court is
a. 8 b. 9 c. 12 d. 15
83. The Constitution guarantees everybody who has done a crime a trial
a. by jury c. in the Supreme Court
b. in the Department of Justice d. in the state of their choice
84. The number of witnesses needed to convict a man of treason is
a. 1 b. 2 c. 3 d. 4
85. A new state may be admitted into the Union only by the
a. Supreme Court c. Congress
b. State Department d. Department of Interior
86. The Constitution guarantees to every state in the Union
a. freedom to make any law it wishes c. legal help
b. a republican form of government d. a pension system
87. To propose an amendment it is necessary to have the agreement of
a. two thirds of both houses of Congress c. the Senate
b. three fourths of both houses of Congress d. the President
88. An amendment goes into the Constitution after it has been ratified by
a. three fourths of the State Legislators c. the Supreme Court
b. two thirds of both houses of Congress d. a majority of Congress
89. No Constitutional amendment could ever change
a. the way we elect the President c. the way Senators are elected
b. equal state representation in the Senate d. the number of states we have
90. Nobody holding a United States office will ever have to pass
a. a Constitution test c. a mental test
b. a religious test d. an age test
91. Congress shall make no law to
a. set voting ages c. establish a draft
b. tax incomes d. set up a religion
92. No personʼs house or property may be searched without a
a. bill of attainder c. search warrant
b. government investigation d. writ of habeas corpus
93. The court may not take a persons life without
a. a circuit judgeʼs agreement c. due process of law
b. evidence of treason d. a confession
94. A person accused of a crime has the right to
a. hear the witnesses against them
b. appeal their case to the Supreme Court
c. have any judge he or she wants
d. be tried wherever they choose
95. The President is elected if
a. they receive a majority of the electoral votes
b. they receive the most popular votes
c. they win the most states
d. they receive the most electoral votes
96. If the candidates for President have no majority of the electoral votes, the
President is elected by the
a. Cabinet c. Senate
b. House of Representatives d. Supreme Court
97. A citizen of the U.S. is a person who
a. owns property in the U.S. c. is white and was born or naturalized here
b. pays taxes d. was born or naturalized here
98. The U.S. can punish a state which denies the right of citizens to vote by
a. fining it
b. reducing its number of Representatives
c. putting it out of the Union
d. reducing its number of Senators
99. How many articles are in the Constitution?
a. 7 b. 21 c. 27 d. 10
100. How many amendments are in the Constitution?
a. 7 b. 21 c. 27 d. 10
MATCHING – Write the number of the amendment that corresponds with the
appropriate amendment.
101. ________ right to bear arms
102. ________ defines citizens and their rights
103. ________ voting age lowered to 18
104. ________ freedom of expression (speech, press, religion, assemble, petition)
105. ________ abolition of slavery
106. ________ right of women to vote
107. ________ income tax
108. ________ repeal of prohibition
109. ________ election of the President & Vice President and who chooses if no
majority
110. ________ limit of presidential terms
111. ________ presidential disability and succession, process for choosing a new V.P.
112. ________ powers reserved to the states
113. ________ prohibition of alcoholic beverages
114. ________ “lame duck” amendment, moves up date of Presidentʼs inauguration
115. ________ direct election of senators by the people
116. ________ powers reserved to the people
117. ________ right of Washington D.C. to vote in presidential election
118. ________ no quartering of troops
119. ________ bail and punishment
120. ________ suits against the states
121. ________ abolition of poll taxes
122. ________ search and seizure
123. ________ a speedy and fair trial
124. ________ civil suits have the right to a jury
125. ________ rights of an accused person, double jeopardy
126. ________ right of black men to vote
127. ________ congressional salaries

 

Printable Copy

The American Constitution

U.S. Voting & Election Resources

The Office of the Federal Register does not have official ties to these web sites and is not responsible for their content or maintaining their existence on the Internet.

Voting

The Election Process

Campaign Finance

State Sites

Electoral College Teaching Resources

What is the Electoral College?

The Electoral College is a process, not a place. The founding fathers established it in theConstitution as a compromise between election of the President by a vote in Congress and election of the President by a popular vote of qualified citizens.

The Electoral College process consists of the selection of the electors, the meeting of the electors where they vote for President and Vice President, and the counting of the electoral votes by Congress.

The Electoral College consists of 538 electors. A majority of 270 electoral votes is required to elect the President. Your state’s entitled allotment of electors equals the number of members in its Congressional delegation: one for each member in the House of Representatives plus two for your Senators. Read more about the allocation of electoral votes.

Under the 23rd Amendment of the Constitution, the District of Columbia is allocated 3 electors and treated like a state for purposes of the Electoral College. For this reason, in the following discussion, the word “state” also refers to the District of Columbia.

Each candidate running for President in your state has his or her own group of electors. The electors are generally chosen by the candidate’s political party, but state laws vary on how the electors are selected and what their responsibilities are. Read more about thequalifications of the Electors and restrictions on who the Electors may vote for.

The presidential election is held every four years on the Tuesday after the first Monday in November. You help choose your state’s electors when you vote for President because when you vote for your candidate you are actually voting for your candidate’s electors.

Most states have a “winner-take-all” system that awards all electors to the winning presidential candidate. However, Maine and Nebraska each have a variation of “proportional representation.” Read more about the allocation of Electors among the states and try topredict the outcome of the Electoral College vote.

After the presidential election, your governor prepares a “Certificate of Ascertainment” listing all of the candidates who ran for President in your state along with the names of their respective electors. The Certificate of Ascertainment also declares the winning presidential candidate in your state and shows which electors will represent your state at the meeting of the electors in December of the election year. Your stateÂ’s Certificates of Ascertainments are sent to the Congress and the National Archives as part of the official records of the presidential election. See the key dates for the 2016 election and information about the roles and responsibilities of state officials, the Office of the Federal Register and the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), and the Congress in the Electoral College process.

The meeting of the electors takes place on the first Monday after the second Wednesday in December after the presidential election. The electors meet in their respective states, where they cast their votes for President and Vice President on separate ballots. Your state’s electors’ votes are recorded on a “Certificate of Vote,” which is prepared at the meeting by the electors. Your state’s Certificates of Votes are sent to the Congress and the National Archives as part of the official records of the presidential election. See the key dates for the 2016 election and information about the roles and responsibilities of state officials and theCongress in the Electoral College process.

Each state’s electoral votes are counted in a joint session of Congress on the 6th of January in the year following the meeting of the electors. Members of the House and Senate meet in the House chamber to conduct the official tally of electoral votes. See the key dates for the 2016 election and information about the role and responsibilities of Congress in the Electoral College process.

The Vice President, as President of the Senate, presides over the count and announces the results of the vote. The President of the Senate then declares which persons, if any, have been elected President and Vice President of the United States.

The President-Elect takes the oath of office and is sworn in as President of the United States on January 20th in the year following the Presidential election.

 

Learn about the Electors

 

Roles and Responsibilities in the Electoral College Process

The Office of the Federal Register coordinates the functions of the Electoral College on behalf of the Archivist of the United States, the States, the Congress, and the American People. The Office of the Federal Register operates as an intermediary between the governors and secretaries of state of the States and the Congress. It also acts as a trusted agent of the Congress in the sense that it is responsible for reviewing the legal sufficiency of the certificates before the House and Senate accept them as evidence of official State action.

See the key dates for the 2016 election and information about the roles and responsibilities of state officials, the Office of the Federal Register and the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), and the Congress in the Electoral College process.

Important Election Dates

The 2016 Presidential Election

Results from the 2016 Presidential Election will be posted as they become available.

Summary of Key Dates for the 2016 Presidential Election
June through October 2016

The Office of the Federal Register, on behalf of the Archivist of the United States, prepares Electoral College instructional materials for the Archivist to send to the governors of the 50 States and the mayor of the District of Columbia.

The materials include:

Under the 23rd Amendment of the Constitution, the District of Columbia is allocated 3 electors and treated like a state for purposes of the Electoral College. For this reason, in the following discussion, the word “state” also refers to the District of Columbia and the word “governor” also refers to the Mayor of the District of Columbia.

November 8, 2016—Election Day

Registered voters cast their votes for President and Vice President. By doing so, they also help choose the electors who will represent their state in the Electoral College.

Mid-November through December 19, 2016

After the presidential election, the governor of your state prepares seven Certificates of Ascertainment. “As soon as practicable,” after the election results in your state are certified, the governor sends one of the Certificates of Ascertainment to the Archivist.

Certificates of Ascertainment should be sent to the Archivist no later than the meeting of the electors in December. However, federal law sets no penalty for missing the deadline.

The remaining six Certificates of Ascertainment are held for use at the meeting of the Electors in December.

December 13, 2016

States must make final decisions in any controversies over the appointment of their electors at least six days before the meeting of the Electors. This is so their electoral votes will be presumed valid when presented to Congress.

Decisions by states’ courts are conclusive, if decided under laws enacted before Election Day.

December 19, 2016

The Electors meet in their state and vote for President and Vice President on separate ballots. The electors record their votes on six “Certificates of Vote,” which are paired with the six remaining Certificates of Ascertainment.

The electors sign, seal, and certify six sets of electoral votes. A set of electoral votes consists of one Certificate of Ascertainment and one Certificate of Vote. These are distributed immediately as follows:

  • one set to the President of the Senate (the Vice President) for the official count of the electoral votes in January;
  • two packages to the Secretary of State in the state where the electors met—one is an archival set that becomes part of the public record of the Secretary of State’s office and the other is a reserve set that is subject to the call of the President of the Senate to replace missing or incomplete electoral votes;
  • two packages to the Archivist—one is an archival set that becomes part of the permanent collection at the National Archives and Records Administration and the other is a reserve set that is subject to the call of the President of the Senate to replace missing or incomplete electoral votes; and
  • one set to the presiding judge in the district where the Electors met—this is also a reserve set that is subject to the call of the President of the Senate to replace missing or incomplete electoral votes.

December 28, 2016

Electoral votes (the Certificates of Vote) must be received by the President of the Senate and the Archivist no later than nine days after the meeting of the electors. States face no legal penalty for failure to comply.

If votes are lost or delayed, the Archivist may take extraordinary measures to retrieve duplicate originals.

On or Before January 3, 2017

The Archivist and/or representatives from the Office of the Federal Register meet with the Secretary of the Senate and the Clerk of the House in late December or early January. This is, in part, a ceremonial occasion. Informal meetings may take place earlier.

January 6, 2017

The Congress meets in joint session to count the electoral votes. Congress may pass a law to change this date.

The Vice President, as President of the Senate, presides over the count and announces the results of the Electoral College vote. The President of the Senate then declares which persons, if any, have been elected President and Vice President of the United States.

If a State submits conflicting sets of electoral votes to Congress, the two Houses acting concurrently may accept or reject the votes. If they do not concur, the votes of the electors certified by the Governor of the State on the Certificate of Ascertainment would be counted in Congress.

If no Presidential candidate wins 270 or more electoral votes, a majority, the 12th Amendment to the Constitution provides for the House of Representatives to decide the Presidential election. If necessary the House would elect the President by majority vote, choosing from the three candidates who received the greatest number of electoral votes. The vote would be taken by state, with each state having one vote.

If no Vice Presidential candidate wins 270 or more electoral votes, a majority, the 12th Amendment provides for the Senate to elect the Vice President. If necessary, the Senate would elect the Vice President by majority vote, choosing from the two candidates who received the greatest number of electoral votes. The vote would be taken by state, with each Senator having one vote.

If any objections to the Electoral College vote are made, they must be submitted in writing and be signed by at least one member of the House and one Senator. If objections are presented, the House and Senate withdraw to their respective chambers to consider their merits under procedures set out in federal law.

January 20, 2017 at Noon—Inauguration Day

The President-elect takes the Oath of Office and becomes the President of the United States.

General Authority

The Archivist of the United States, as the head of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), is responsible for carrying out ministerial duties on behalf of the States and the Congress under 3 U.S.C. sections 6, 11, 12, and 13.

NARA is primarily responsible for coordinating the various stages of the electoral process by helping the States prepare and submit certificates that establish the appointment of electors and validate the electoral votes of each State.

The Archivist delegates operational duties to the Director of the Federal Register. The Federal Register Legal Staff ensures that electoral documents are transmitted to Congress, made available to the public, and preserved as part of our nation’s history.

The Office of the Federal Register Legal Staff reviews the electoral certificates for the required signatures, seals and other matters of form, as specified in federal law.

Only the Congress and the courts have the authority to rule on substantive legal issues.

Office of the Federal Register, National Archives and Records Administration

7 Things You Don’t Know About ADD That Can Hurt You

7 Things You Don’t Know About ADD That Can Hurt You

8x4-addADD is the most common learning and behavior problem in children. But the issue doesn’t end there: It is also one of the most common problems in adults, and has been associated with serious problems in school, relationships, work, and families. Despite its prevalence, many myths and misconceptions about ADD abound in our society. Here are just a few of them:

MYTH: ADD is a flavor-of-the-month illness, a fad diagnosis. It’s just an excuse for bad behavior.

FACT: ADD has been described in the medical literature for about one hundred years. In 1902, pediatrician George Still described a group of children who were hyperactive, impulsive, and inattentive. Unfortunately, he didn’t understand that ADD is a medical disorder and labeled these children as “morally defective.”

 

MYTH #2: ADD is overdiagnosed. Every child who acts up a bit, or adult who is lazy, gets placed on Ritalin or Adderall.

FACT: Less than half of those with ADD are being treated.

 

MYTH#3: ADD is only a disorder of hyperactive boys.

FACT: Many people with ADD are never hyperactive. The non- hyperactive or “inattentive” ADD folks are often ignored because they do not bring enough negative attention to themselves. Many of these children, teenagers, or adults earn the unjust labels “willful,” “lazy,” “unmotivated,” or “not that smart.” Females, in our experience, tend to have inattentive ADD, and it often devastates their lives.

 

MYTH #4: ADD is only a minor problem. People make too much of a fuss over it.

FACT: Left untreated or ineffectively treated, ADD is a very serious societal problem! Although previous research has demonstrated that ADD is associated with problems like job failures, relationship breakups, drug abuse, and obesity, recently published research in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatryconducted a systematic review of all the available evidence and confirmed the link between ADD and a wide range of health and psychosocial problems. The study demonstrates the importance of properly treating ADD early in life in order to potentially prevent these future adverse outcomes.

 

MYTH #5: ADD is an American invention, made up by a society seeking simple solutions to complex social problems.

FACT: ADD is found in every country where it has been studied. I once had a patient from Ethiopia who had been expelled from his tribe for being so easily distracted and impulsive.

 

MYTH #6: People with ADD should just try harder.

FACT: Often the harder people with ADD try, the worse things get for them. Brain-imaging studies show that when people with ADD try to concentrate, the parts of their brains involved with concentration, focus, and follow-through (prefrontal cortex and cerebellum) actually shuts down—just when they need them to turn on.

 

MYTH #7: Everyone who has ADD will get better if they just take stimulant medication.

FACT: ADD, like many other conditions, is not just a single and simple disorder; therefore, treatment is not a one-size-fits-all solution. With more than 120,000 brain scans in our database, we have identified 7 types of ADD. And each type requires a different treatment plan because of the diverse brain systems involved.

Amen Clinics has helped tens of thousands of people with ADD from all over the world and can help you, too. To learn more or schedule a comprehensive evaluation, contact the Amen Clinics Care Center today at 855-698-5108 orhttps://www.amenclinics.com/schedule-visit/.