Category Archives: Gifts

The Leader in Me

This summer, I joined this book study with this group in Chatham, Illinois, via Google Docs. My lifetime friend, Pam Hogan, and her team started this move in Chatham in 2016 and as you will hear from the principal, Elizabeth Gregurich, who is an awesome top down supporter, the paradigm shift is visible on their campus.  The district technology lead, Josh Mulvaney, is now involved via the book study,  which took it to district level.

Why did this hit home for me?  As stated in the previous post, finding everyone’s gifts, talents, passions, skills is what I have been preaching about for years.  “Everyone is a Genius”  states Elizabeth Gregurich.  I believe we all put on this planet for purpose and to delve into what those gifts, skills, talents and passions are will help you find yours!  “What is your genius”?

Albert Einstein wrote, “Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.” The question I have for you at this point of our journey together is, “What is your genius?”

We know that ALL students can learn.  Students learn very differently just as you do.  How do we reach all students?  Differentiating instruction, meeting all modalities, understanding we all learn best at different times of the day, understanding we all don’t hear everything the first time, understanding that everyone is in a different place with prior knowledge, not everyone understands the academic language, and everyone has very different home situations.  These are the many concepts that educators must consider in a day while teaching their topic.

So, I have taken on the task to assist with “peppering” this cultural change onto their already full plate without the feeling of adding more to an already hectic schedule.  I’m looking for inspiration from all of you reading this.  Hoping someone in each district will look at the powerful positive outcome this creates and take it on for the sake of students and community.  Hopefully, this group will develop into assisting each other with ideas that create the interdependence necessary to produce best practices.~Sandy

Enjoy  the video below on how this school implemented the “The 7 Habits for Highly Effective People” through “The Leader In Me” as well as other resources.

 

I apologize for the quality but its about getting it said and done, not how perfect it is. ~Sandy

Trade School vs. College

Many realize that not everyone is created to go to college.  What are your talents? Gifts? Skills?  What is your passion?  Take that route! ~Sandy

Why You Should Consider Trade School Instead of College

For a lot of people, going to a four-year college seems like an automatic choice when they graduate from high school. The reason is obvious – higher income. According to theNational Center for Educational Statistics, a bachelor’s degree accounted for an average of $16,900 in additional income per year compared to a high school diploma ($30,000 versus $46,900).

Over a 30-year career in the workforce, that’s more than a $500,000 difference in earnings. These numbers may not paint the whole picture, however. Due to the increasingly high costs associated with a college education, as well as other drawbacks, more and more people have been considering trade school as an education alternative. If you’re one of them, you can actually search for a great trade school right here using the tool below:

Find Schools That Fit YouThree easy steps and we’ll connect you to our online education partner that matches your needs.

Sponsored schools

Trade School vs. College: Drawbacks to College Education

Length: Four (or More) Years vs. Two Years

For starters, a bachelor’s degree typically takes four years of study, which means that people who enter the workforce after receiving their bachelor’s degree aren’t doing so until age 22. That shaves some years off of a person’s career and can be considered an opportunity cost for experiencing the ‘real world’ hands on instead of being in a classroom. Plus, a four-year program usually makes you take classes outside of your major to fulfill credit requirements. Unless you enjoy spending time in a classroom, it may seem unnecessary to pay for extraneous credits and courses. Sure, that improv theater class was fun, but was it helpful for your chemistry major?

High Cost of a Bachelor’s Degree

Another drawback is the cost. Research conducted by the Idaho Department of Laborfound that the average bachelor’s degree in the United States costs $127,000! Not only that, but nearly 70% of students take out loans to help pay for school. According to the study, over 20% of students with loans owe more than $50,000, and 5.6% owe more than $100,000 at the end. Although some student loans are certainly better than others, the added cost of accruing interest makes the overall expense of receiving an education in the U.S. significantly higher for the average student than the already steep price tag suggests. The college lifestyle isn’t cheap either — dorming, paying for food, going out, and even doing your own laundry adds up!

Dropout Rate + Late Grads

A third drawback: Some people simply aren’t prepared for the rigors of a four-year college. For many students, college is their first experience away from home and, without an adequate plan, it’s easy to stray off course. In fact, the Institute of Education Statisticsestimates that 40% of attendees at a four-year college drop out before completing their degree. If you find yourself as a part of that 40%, not only have you incurred some of the expense of college, you left without receiving a degree. For the 60% that do complete their degree, a whopping 64% take longer than four years to graduate, costing themselves nearly $70,000 in lost wages and educational expenses per year, according toU.S. News. Most colleges don’t even require students to pick a major until the end of their sophomore year, creating a class of undecided students who may have wasted their time and credits on courses that they chose not to pursue.

Poor Economic Conditions

Finally: Job prospects for new graduates may not be as bright as they had expected. Although some college majors are faring better than others when it comes to labor market outcomes, a recent report released by the Economic Policy Institute states that overall, the unemployment (8.5%) and underemployment (16.8%) rates for college graduates under the age of 25 are nearly double what they were in 2007. Over the past five years, graduates have faced sluggish labor markets Young graduates are faced with limited job opportunities and difficulty paying off their student loans. College degrees are a career investment that require a considerable amount of both time and money, and the portion of grads who are unable to find desirable employment (or employment at all!) are seeing negative returns.

Trade School as an Alternative

My response to these statistics is that people approaching high school graduation should seriously consider trade school, particularly if they are not at the top of their class. A traditional four-year degree is not for everyone, and trade school offers a pretty compelling career path, especially when considering the factors associated with a college education outlined above. I’ll provide an overview of what a trade school education is, who it would be best for, and some of the advantages of trade school versus college.

What is a Trade School or Vocational School?

A trade school, also known as a technical or vocational school, is an educational institution that exists to teach skills related to a specific job. Trade schools are a more streamlined approach to education, with curricula focusing on developing a particular skillset and knowledge base for a career rather than receiving a general education. Trade schools typically take a lot less time to complete, have smaller class sizes, and the majority of the training is hands-on, which is an ideal environment for many types of learners. Vocational degrees can lead to well-paying jobs like electrician, mechanic, machinist, pharmacy technician, nuclear technician, and dental hygienist, with room for growth and managerial potential in each field.

Advantages to Trade Schools

Salaries for Trade School Jobs

For starters, salaries for trade school graduates aren’t that much of a drop-off compared to a four-year degree. According to the National Center for Educational Statistics, technical and trade school jobs have a median annual salary of $35,720, though this figure varies heavily based on the particular industry and the experience level of the worker. The BLS predicted earnings for bachelor’s degree holders to be roughly $46,900, amounting to an annual difference of $11,180. This stat, of course, doesn’t factor in long term earnings growth.

However, because trade school only takes an average of two years to complete versus four, that amounts to an additional two years of income for the trade school graduate, or $71,440. Factor in another $70,000 in costs for the many students who take an extra year to graduate from college, and trade school grads can be over $140,000 ahead at the get-go, making up for over 12 years of difference in income.

Price of Education

The average trade school degree costs $33,000, which, compared to a $127,000 bachelor’s degree, means a savings of $94,000. But that’s not all! If you assume that students are fully financing their education with loans at 4% over 10 years, the bachelor’s degree will cost $154,000, while the trade school degree will cost only $40,000. That’s a savings of $114,000 just on the degree.

Of course, most students in both cases won’t fully finance their education. They’ll work and find other sources of income to help with the process, meaning the gap will be smaller in the average case. Research gathered in 2012 suggests that the average college student debt load is $29,900, and that number rises to $36,327 when factoring in interest. Conversely, the average debt load for students graduating from a two-year technical school is $10,000, roughly 70% less than the four-year graduate.

Job Security

Yet another advantage of technical trade school is that most of the jobs you’ll get are extremely difficult to export to another country. More and more jobs are being outsourced to places where labor is cheaper, making domestic employment in certain sectors difficult to get. It is much easier to export, say, computer programming work or other information economy work than it is to export carpentry or electrical work, as that requires a physical presence.

Not only that, but there’s a growing domestic demand for high-precision skills. According to Forbes, skilled trade workers are a disproportionately older population, and will only continue to get older, creating increased opportunities for young workers to fill their shoes.

Final Thoughts on Trade School vs. College

It should be noted that I’m not opposed to a four-year degree; instead, I’m simply making a strong case for an option that many people overlook when deciding what to do after high school. In lifetime earnings, a bachelor’s degree still pays off – don’t get me wrong. According to statistics, a person with a bachelor’s degree is projected to earn around $1.1 million, compared to the $393,000 projected earnings of an associate’s degree or trade school program graduate.

The advantages of a four-year degree are many: You’re going to earn much more later on in life and you also have the door wide open to continue your studies and earn substantially more with a masters degree or doctorate, however the cost/benefit equation to even higher education is changing every day.

Trade school graduates are very limited in opportunities to continue to bolster their education. That being said, a four-year degree is expensive, and not suited to everyone’s learning style and skill set. If you’re a hands-on learner, excited by the prospects of getting out of the classroom and starting to work immediately after high school, trade school is a relatively inexpensive alternative education that may work well for you. Take advantage of the search tool above to learn more about trade schools near you and what they offer.

I’ll leave you with an anecdote. My wife’s cousin graduated from high school at roughly the same time my wife graduated. Her cousin went to electrician’s school, while my wife went to four-year university. Her cousin started working three years before my wife and incurred much less student loan debt. Today, though he makes a little bit less money than she does, the difference isn’t very significant, plus he had hardly any debt to pay off after school.

This past May, my nephew graduated from high school. He is now attending electrician’s school as well. I think it’s the wisest move he could have made in his situation.

If you are graduating from high school soon, or have a loved one who is approaching graduation, I recommend seriously considering trade school as an alternative option. If you’re still unsure about your academic future or you’re looking for more information and options, check out our education series.

Considering Trade School: An Infographic

Consider Trade School

Ways to Serve God Through Serving Others in the New Year!

To serve God is to serve others and is the greatest form of charity: the pure love of Christ. Jesus Christ said:

A new commandment I give unto you, That ye love one another; as I have loved you, that ye also love one another. (John 13:34).

 

Looking for ways to improve 2016?  This list gives 15 ways in which we can serve God by serving others:

1.  Serve God Through Your Family

To serve God starts with serving our families. Daily we work, clean, love, support, listen to, teach, and endlessly give of ourselves to our family. We may often feel overwhelmed with all that we must do. As we lovingly give of ourselves to our family, and serve them with hearts full of love, our acts also serve God.

2.  Give Tithes and Offerings

One of the ways we can serve God is by helping His children, our brothers and sisters, through tithing, a generous offering. Money from tithing is used to build God’s kingdom on the earth. Contributing financially to God’s work is a great way to serve God. Money from offerings is used to help the hungry, thirsty, naked, strange, sick, and afflicted (see Matt 25:34-36) both those locally and world wide.

3.  Volunteer in Your Community

There are countless ways to serve God by serving in your community. From donating blood to adopting a highway, your local community has great need of your time, efforts and resources.  You can easily become involved in your community by contacting a local group, charity, or other community program.

 4.  Home Visiting

Home visit opportunities provide a means by which an important aspect of character may be developed:  love of service above self.  Stop in to see someone in need.

5.  Donate Clothing and Other Goods

All throughout the world, there are places to donate unused clothing, shoes, dishes, blankets/quilts, toys, furniture, books, and other items. Generously giving of these items to help others is an easy way to serve God and declutter your home at the same time.

When preparing those things you are going to donate it is always appreciated if you only give those items that are clean and in working order. Donating dirty, broken, or useless items is less effective and takes precious time from volunteers and other workers as they sort and organize the items to be distributed or sold to others.

Stores that resell donated items usually offer much needed jobs to the less fortunate which is another excellent form of service.

6.  Be a Friend

One of the simplest and easiest ways to serve God and others is by befriending one another. As we take the time to serve and be friendly, we’ll not only support others but also build a network of support for ourselves. Make others feel at home, and soon you’ll feel at home. Who does not love and need friends? Let us make a new friend today!

7.  Serve God by Serving Children

So many children and teenagers need our love and we can give it!  There are many programs to become involved with helping children and you can easily become a school or community volunteer.  Jesus Christ loves all the children of the world and so too should we love and serve them.

8.  Mourn with Those that Mourn

Carefully asking appropriate questions often helps people feel your love and empathy for them and their situation. Following the whisperings of the Spirit will help guide us to know what to say or do as we care for one another.

9.  Follow Inspiration

When going through my own trials, I listened for inspiration.  I took every meeting and every phone call.  I read every book that was presented.  Each time I was obedient, I felt His inspiration!  What an incredible walk with Jesus.  Listen and move!  Follow His steps for you and be truly inspired!

10.  Share Your Talents

Each of us have been given talents from the Lord that we should develop and use to serve God and others. Examine your life and find your gifts, skills and talents.  What are you good at? How could you use your talents to help those around you?  Are you good with children? Do you enjoy time with the elderly?  Do you like to cook or bake?  Are you good with your hands? Computers? Gardening? Building? Organizing? You can help others with your skills by praying for help to develop your talents.

11.  Simple Acts of Service

Sometimes all it takes to serve God is to give a smile, hug, wave, prayer, facebook message, text or a friendly phone call to someone in need.

12.  Serve God Through Missionary Work

One of the most important and rewarding ways in which we can serve our fellowmen is by living and sharing the principles of the gospel. We need to help those whom we seek to serve to know for themselves that God not only loves them but he is ever mindful of them and their needs.

13.  Fulfill Your Callings

When we seek to serve others, we are motivated not by selfishness but by charity and giving. This is the way Jesus Christ lived His life. Faithfully serving in our callings is to faithfully serve God.

14.  Use Your Creativity: It Comes from God

We are compassionate creators of a compassionate and creative being. The Lord will bless and help us as we creatively and compassionately serve one another. The Lord will bless us with the needed strength, guidance, patience, charity, and love to serve His children.

15.  Serve God by Humbling Yourself

I believe it is impossible to truly serve God and His children if we, ourselves, are full of pride. Developing humility is a choice that takes effort but as we come to understand why we should be humble, it will become easier to become humble. As we humble ourselves before the Lord our desire to serve God will greatly increase as will our capacity to be able to give of ourselves in the service of all our brothers and sisters.

Our Heavenly Father deeply loves us- more than we can imagine- and as we follow the Savior’s command to “love one another; as I have loved you” we will be able to do so. May we find simple, yet profound ways to daily serve God as we serve each other.

By Rachel Bruner

Updated by Krista Cook on December 01, 2015.

Adapted for this page by Sandy Carl December 21, 2015.

Passion. Motivation. Inspiration.

This is a few of the lines from the attached video.  Get inspired!

Your time is limited.  You have got to find what you love.  Work will fill a large part of your life.  Have the courage to follow your hearts.  Up and downs will occur.  The real challenge of growth comes from when you get knocked down.  It takes courage to start over.  Fear kills!  At the end of feelings is nothing.  But Behind every principal is a promise.  Get over your feelings!  Don’t allow your emotions to control you.  Discipline your emotions.  Don’t allow your emotions to control you!  Make a declaration of what you stand for!  Take full responsibility for your life!  Life each day as if it were your last.  Live your life with PASSION.  with some drive.  It doesn’t matter what happens to you. What are you going to do about it!  Don’t give up!  Don’t give in!

PASSION IN EDUCATION RECEIVES AWARD 2015

IMG_6700 IMG_6702Passion in Education Receives 2015 Best of Visalia Award

Visalia Award Program Honors the Achievement

VISALIA July 2, 2015 — Passion in Education has been selected for the 2015 Best of Visalia Award in the Education category by the Visalia Award Program.

Each year, the Visalia Award Program identifies companies that we believe have achieved exceptional marketing success in their local community and business category. These are local companies that enhance the positive image of small business through service to their customers and our community. These exceptional companies help make the Visalia area a great place to live, work and play.

Various sources of information were gathered and analyzed to choose the winners in each category. The 2015 Visalia Award Program focuses on quality, not quantity. Winners are determined based on the information gathered both internally by the Visalia Award Program and data provided by third parties.

About Visalia Award Program

The Visalia Award Program is an annual awards program honoring the achievements and accomplishments of local businesses throughout the Visalia area. Recognition is given to those companies that have shown the ability to use their best practices and implemented programs to generate competitive advantages and long-term value.

The Visalia Award Program was established to recognize the best of local businesses in our community. Our organization works exclusively with local business owners, trade groups, professional associations and other business advertising and marketing groups. Our mission is to recognize the small business community’s contributions to the U.S. economy.